Anonymous asked:

You mentioned enjoying bacon at breakfast, yet those pigs you draw look pretty happy – did you perhaps just fail to notice a dissonance here? (By “dissonance” I just mean some half-numbed ethical itch one, very carefully, avoids scratching – suspecting that it might then start to bleed, profusely…)

image

Did I fail to notice a dissonance between my drawings and the meat on my plate? I’m not sure I accept the premise of your question. Since it relies on the assumption that eating meat can only happen in some sort of ethical void. I’m not going to go into my consuming habits here, or dig up pictures of the pot belly pig I had (along with a range of other animals) at one point. But suffice it to say I love animals, and I love meat. Therefore I find it important to know where it came from and how it was raised.
So, yes, I’m basically this Portlandia-bit.

ignoranimus asked:

Apologies for my ignorance, but what was so bad about the "Seeking an illustrator" post?

Apart from the fact that illustration, illustrator, commission, and children’s book were misspelled?
Apart from how this person only realized after printing the poster that they had forgotten the word ‘seeking’?
And apart from the compensation for the work being ‘partnership or commision’
Apart from that nothing, except that some people were actually desperate enough to tear off a contact-strip.

groeneinkt:

Oh boy!

Saw this at a local purveyor of sandwiches. The most amazing thing about it is that all the contact-thingies were taken. If any of my followers are illustration students at Syracuse university, please have some self-respect.

groeneinkt:

Oh boy!

Saw this at a local purveyor of sandwiches. The most amazing thing about it is that all the contact-thingies were taken. If any of my followers are illustration students at Syracuse university, please have some self-respect.

Here are some pictures from Santa Clauses, a book I illustrated that is out now.
I also have a proper website for the first time in (not literally) forever. www.chuckgroenink.com
You’ll find some more information about this book there. 

chuckgroenink:

Every now and then people ask me about my process, how I colour things in or achieve certain textures. I always mean to answer these questions, but it’s kind of complicated and it would be a bit time consuming.
So here instead are some pictures to do that job. A caveat here is that I rarely work the same way twice and every job is generally an experiment in figuring out new ways to work. But lately quite often my process is something like this.

Step one is to start on paper with ink or gouache. I scan that in and through some photoshop magic (selecting black and white channels and copying to layers) turn every piece into layers. These are actually all things I still happened to have on file. For my last book I made a little data base of rocks, trees and branches to use wherever I needed something. Think of it as a form of collage.

I very quickly put these things together for this demo. Then put every layer on a transparency lock (it’s in the layer window). The next step is basically just messing around with colours. I have a pretty large collection of custom brushes made from various ink and paint washes and splashes. You can basically just use those as rubber stamps to add colours and textures to your layers. This is where the transparency lock comes in handy, as you don’t need to select anything.
Finally I mess around with some adjustment layers to see if something interesting will happen to the colours I hadn’t planned on.
And that’s basically it.

I got some questions about my colouring process lately, so I thought I’d reblog this. It’s a bit old, but I still work pretty much the same way for a lot of projects. Sometimes I draw directly in photoshop and use those custom brushes to layer colours and textures on shapes, or I make something predominantly with pencils. In which case I either use a transparency lock on the linework and colour it in that way. Or it barely needs any work.
Which frankly, seems like a better and better idea the longer I’m working on my current mess of bits of scanned in gouache and ink washes.

We moved into a new place this week and I finally have a decent studio again!