groeneinkt:

In Iceland they light bonfires to celebrate the summer solstice. I sat in a car for 11 hours and had mediocre sushi, before taking a bath.
The picture goes with this other piece: chuckgroenink.tumblr.com/post/34451614001/illustration-i-did-a-while-ago-for-a-magazine-back

groeneinkt:

In Iceland they light bonfires to celebrate the summer solstice. I sat in a car for 11 hours and had mediocre sushi, before taking a bath.
The picture goes with this other piece: chuckgroenink.tumblr.com/post/34451614001/illustration-i-did-a-while-ago-for-a-magazine-back

Well, I’m off to North Carolina for a week of this.
Haha, actually I hate the beach and hot weather.

Well, I’m off to North Carolina for a week of this.

Haha, actually I hate the beach and hot weather.

paddle8:

Colin Meloy of the Decemberists and children’s book illustrator, Carson Ellis have come together for an auction to benefit Victory Academy, Oregon’s only school for children of the Autism spectrum. We had the opportunity to speak with them on the occasion of the sale:
Have either of you done something like this before?
Carson: We’ve organized auctions of Decemberists ephemera on eBay a couple of time; the same idea really but less classy and for a specific audience.
Colin: We’ve had a thing going for a bit that once a year we’d auction off Decemberist detritus (posters, guitars, cardboard cutout whales) for some cause. People seemed to like it.
How did this auction come about?
Carson: Well, Victory Academy - a school for kids with autism that our son, Hank, attends - currently rents a small space that they share with a church and are totally at capacity. We love this school. I can’t really overstate the happy impact it’s had on our lives. But right now they’re struggling to make space at their present location for new students next fall, even though they’re being flooded with applications from families like ours, who are often (as we were) at a loss for other options. So they’re building a new school. They already own 4 acres of farmland and have plans for a lovely LEED-certified school that they’re currently raising the money to build.
Colin: A lot of parents are organizing various fundraising efforts to support the school’s Capital Campaign. We knew we wanted to help and this seemed like a good way to do it. I’m a children’s book illustrator with a terrific community of illustrator friends. I didn’t really relish the idea of bugging them all for donations but this means a lot to me. Like I said, this school changed our lives and I’d like it to be able to do the same for other kids and their families. So I hit up all of these great illustrators for artwork and was totally flooded with generosity and support.
What makes you feel so passionately about this project?
Colin: We’ve seen the difference that Victory Academy can make for families and would like to see the school grow and expand. It makes sense to reach out to the communities that have supported my music and Carson’s art in the past — and the work we’ve done together — as a way to raise money and increase awareness.
Does your son influence your creative process?
Colin: He is a great reader and was always a willing listener when I was working on the Wildwood books. I’d come in after a day of writing and read the pages to him. He even suggested some changes in the final draft of WILDWOOD IMPERIUM. He has a whacky imagination — more often than not, his suggestions involved alien invasions and things like that — but it was really fun to have him so close to the process.
Does he have a favorite illustration in the sale?
Carson: He likes Adam Rex’s graphite drawing for THE TRUE MEANING OF SMEKDAY, which may be his all-time favorite book. I’ve read it to him twice, we’ve listened to the audiobook and I can’t even guess how many time he’s read it through himself. I bid on that piece but have already been outbid. Now, I’m trying to decide how fiercely to go after it.
And, yes, Hank’s a pretty creative kid. He likes to invite wild stories. Like Colin said earlier, he’s into sci-fi: galactic battles and asteroids colliding with planets and the like.
Is there anything you hope to achieve through this auction?
Colin: Hopefully the auction will also raise awareness about Victory’s longterm mission of creating a healthy and happy school environment for kids on the autism spectrum.
Carson: What he said. Mostly we want to see Victory Academy in a good space that will allow it to grow and accommodate more kids.
Thanks, Colin and Carson! Bidding is live for Victory Academy through April 29.

paddle8:

Colin Meloy of the Decemberists and children’s book illustrator, Carson Ellis have come together for an auction to benefit Victory Academy, Oregon’s only school for children of the Autism spectrum. We had the opportunity to speak with them on the occasion of the sale:

Have either of you done something like this before?

Carson: We’ve organized auctions of Decemberists ephemera on eBay a couple of time; the same idea really but less classy and for a specific audience.

Colin: We’ve had a thing going for a bit that once a year we’d auction off Decemberist detritus (posters, guitars, cardboard cutout whales) for some cause. People seemed to like it.

How did this auction come about?

Carson: Well, Victory Academy - a school for kids with autism that our son, Hank, attends - currently rents a small space that they share with a church and are totally at capacity. We love this school. I can’t really overstate the happy impact it’s had on our lives. But right now they’re struggling to make space at their present location for new students next fall, even though they’re being flooded with applications from families like ours, who are often (as we were) at a loss for other options. So they’re building a new school. They already own 4 acres of farmland and have plans for a lovely LEED-certified school that they’re currently raising the money to build.

Colin: A lot of parents are organizing various fundraising efforts to support the school’s Capital Campaign. We knew we wanted to help and this seemed like a good way to do it. I’m a children’s book illustrator with a terrific community of illustrator friends. I didn’t really relish the idea of bugging them all for donations but this means a lot to me. Like I said, this school changed our lives and I’d like it to be able to do the same for other kids and their families. So I hit up all of these great illustrators for artwork and was totally flooded with generosity and support.

What makes you feel so passionately about this project?

Colin: We’ve seen the difference that Victory Academy can make for families and would like to see the school grow and expand. It makes sense to reach out to the communities that have supported my music and Carson’s art in the past — and the work we’ve done together — as a way to raise money and increase awareness.

Does your son influence your creative process?

Colin: He is a great reader and was always a willing listener when I was working on the Wildwood books. I’d come in after a day of writing and read the pages to him. He even suggested some changes in the final draft of WILDWOOD IMPERIUM. He has a whacky imagination — more often than not, his suggestions involved alien invasions and things like that — but it was really fun to have him so close to the process.

Does he have a favorite illustration in the sale?

Carson: He likes Adam Rex’s graphite drawing for THE TRUE MEANING OF SMEKDAY, which may be his all-time favorite book. I’ve read it to him twice, we’ve listened to the audiobook and I can’t even guess how many time he’s read it through himself. I bid on that piece but have already been outbid. Now, I’m trying to decide how fiercely to go after it.

And, yes, Hank’s a pretty creative kid. He likes to invite wild stories. Like Colin said earlier, he’s into sci-fi: galactic battles and asteroids colliding with planets and the like.

Is there anything you hope to achieve through this auction?

Colin: Hopefully the auction will also raise awareness about Victory’s longterm mission of creating a healthy and happy school environment for kids on the autism spectrum.

Carson: What he said. Mostly we want to see Victory Academy in a good space that will allow it to grow and accommodate more kids.

Thanks, Colin and Carson! Bidding is live for Victory Academy through April 29.