Since it’s december, that means it’s time for massive consumerist nonsense! And I’m participating as well, click on the image above to get free shipping and $5 off on most items in my society6 store until december 8.
Above illustration from ‘Boelie’s Kerstplan’ written by Mathilde Stein and published by Lemniscaat in the Netherlands: http://www.bol.com/nl/p/boelies-kerstplanAnd in French by Sarbacane: http://www.amazon.com/boulie-Chuck-Groenink-Mathilde-Stein

Since it’s december, that means it’s time for massive consumerist nonsense! And I’m participating as well, click on the image above to get free shipping and $5 off on most items in my society6 store until december 8.

Above illustration from ‘Boelie’s Kerstplan’ written by Mathilde Stein and published by Lemniscaat in the Netherlands: http://www.bol.com/nl/p/boelies-kerstplan
And in French by Sarbacane: http://www.amazon.com/boulie-Chuck-Groenink-Mathilde-Stein

Got an email from society6 today that they removed this drawing from their site as Warner Brothers sent them a copyright infringement claim. So, I guess they own every little bit of the Hobbit now. I wish though, this meant that the characters in the film actually looked like this. Oh well.Meanwhile this is still up on their site.

Got an email from society6 today that they removed this drawing from their site as Warner Brothers sent them a copyright infringement claim.
So, I guess they own every little bit of the Hobbit now. I wish though, this meant that the characters in the film actually looked like this.
Oh well.
Meanwhile this is still up on their site.

Roman Muradov

deskhermitrecords:

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Roman Muradov is an illustrator and cartoonist who barely needs an introduction here. Originally from Russia, he has been making his fellow illustrators and doodlers sick with envy over the past few years with his incredibly inventive and constantly elegant work.

Here he shares his choices to listen to again and again if he found himself chained to his desk.

My appreciation of the Fall follows a standard pattern of “it’s repetitive and the singer can’t even be bothered to sing, is it even music?” to “it’s repetitive and the singer can’t even be bothered to sing, why do I listen to anything else, ever?” I’m into C.B. is one of Fall’s finest creations, and possibly my favorite song of all time. The dense pummeling rhythm, repeated with hysterical insistence throughout the song is given central stage, unhindered by fancy melodies or excessive production. Lyrically, it’s balancing between the straightforward narratives of Grotesque and marked obscurity of Perverted by Language, complete with MES’s signature attention to mundanities, sharp phrasing and self-referencing. When I try to figure out why I prefer the Fall to any other music, I think it fall back to the initial reaction: it’s borderline not quite music, yet it’s laden with distorted pop artifacts, scattered among the profound strangeness of Mark E.Smith’s delivery.

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Here’s a little thing I thought up recently after listening to Desert Island Discs for too long. If you don’t know Desert Island Discs; it’s a bbc-radio program that’s been around for ages, where famous people get interviewed and share their music choices to listen to if they were stranded on a desert island.
Between the actors, writers and politicians however, there are precious few illustrators. So I thought I’d remedy that a little bit by having illustrators, cartoonists and other doodlers share their 8 music choices if they were bound to their desks forever (As if that is not a situation they haven’t chosen for themselves already).

Anyway; click through to listen to all of Roman’s choices.
I’m going to try to make this a weekly thing, provided I can get people interested.

Anonymous asked:

Hi Chuck! What kind of paper do you recommend for line work like ink or pencil? thanks! (:

I would say, you should try out a bunch of different ones and go with the one that gives you the best results. Or the one that gives you decent results but is pretty cheap.
I don’t believe there are universal answers for these kinds of things. Everyone draws differently, and everyone will have a specific paper they prefer.
In my case, I like to do a lot of my drawing on card stock, because it’s nice and smooth. It’s horrible for ink or paint though, so I generally have some smooth watercolour paper around as well.

Anonymous asked:

Do you have any "go-to" brushes? And do you have a favorite?

I have a couple of brushes that I use a lot, they’re all made from scanned paint splashes. My favourite brush is probably a variation of a chalk-brush with some texture and stuff added to it. I can use it for almost anything.This detail from a larger thing is probably a good example.
For textures and colouring I like to use washes and random splashes of paint, that I scan and turn into brushes. And lately I’ve become enamored of a sponge brush that gives a nice effect (basically, like so many illustrators I’m trying to get the same effect spongy dry brush effect Annette Marnat is so good at).

colorscripts asked:

Hello! Was wondering, with a majority of your work, do you prefer to color traditionally or digitally? I'm really interested in your coloring process and wondering how you do it! You work is some of the best I've seen.

Hi,
and thanks!that’s a hard question to answer, really. My process varies from project to project in all sorts of small ways. I outlined the general process here once: http://chuckgroenink.tumblr.com/post/35522740506/every-now-and-then-people-ask-me-about-my-process
But almost every assignment is different, depending on how digital or traditional my technique is. I will say that I always use photoshop to determine the final colours, because it allows me greater control and because I don’t trust my eyes. When I use colour in painting, etc, I like to mess around with it to see if I can get something nice unexpected results to offset the complete predictability of PS.
At the same time, photoshop allows me to get colours I didn’t originally plan to use, or to bind a pallette together better.
The fact of the matter is that I’m not that good with colour on paper, and used to avoid it altogether, but photoshop has given me the means to not screw up all the time.

groeneinkt:

Entirely appropriate for this afternoon I think.

It started snowing today as I began working on a new book for christmas (next year). An auspicious omen.

groeneinkt:

Entirely appropriate for this afternoon I think.

It started snowing today as I began working on a new book for christmas (next year). An auspicious omen.

groeneinkt:

This mess is possibly the most important part of illustrating a picture book.

 Full disclosure; the framework for this dummy of a dummy is by the inestimable Greg Pizzoli. It’s a very helpful tool when storyboarding a picturebook, as it allows for messing araound with breaking up the text and your pictorial lay out. Previously I would make tiny sketches of the spreads, cut those out and lay them all next to each other. This is basically the same, but quicker. You can find the original framework here on Greg’s blog: http://gregpizzoli.blogspot.com/2013/09/picture-book-layout.html

groeneinkt:

This mess is possibly the most important part of illustrating a picture book.

Full disclosure; the framework for this dummy of a dummy is by the inestimable Greg Pizzoli. It’s a very helpful tool when storyboarding a picturebook, as it allows for messing araound with breaking up the text and your pictorial lay out. Previously I would make tiny sketches of the spreads, cut those out and lay them all next to each other. This is basically the same, but quicker. You can find the original framework here on Greg’s blog: http://gregpizzoli.blogspot.com/2013/09/picture-book-layout.html
Thing I made for a series of alphabet postcards. I don’t actually remember why I chose a duck to go with the letter J.
By the way, we can all agree that ducks are the best birds, right? Probably because they wag their tails.

Thing I made for a series of alphabet postcards. I don’t actually remember why I chose a duck to go with the letter J.

By the way, we can all agree that ducks are the best birds, right? Probably because they wag their tails.

groeneinkt:

Busted out my coloured pencils for an editorial thing I did this week. I hadn’t used those in a very long while, but after a talk with a fellow illustrator I thought I’d play around with them.It’s not even that often that I use regular pencils for my commercial work, but the book I’ve been working on for the better part of the year made me realise it was time to move my techniques into a direction that was more enjoyable and direct. I spend so much time in photoshop trying to make my work looks like I think it ought to, rather than working in a way that actually gives me satisfaction with the process. It’s not that I don’t like my digital work, but the whole business can be very cumbersome. Conversely pencils and paper are about as direct as it gets, it reduces my opportunity for hemming and hawing.Besides it’s always good to shake up your routine.

groeneinkt:

Busted out my coloured pencils for an editorial thing I did this week. I hadn’t used those in a very long while, but after a talk with a fellow illustrator I thought I’d play around with them.
It’s not even that often that I use regular pencils for my commercial work, but the book I’ve been working on for the better part of the year made me realise it was time to move my techniques into a direction that was more enjoyable and direct. I spend so much time in photoshop trying to make my work looks like I think it ought to, rather than working in a way that actually gives me satisfaction with the process. It’s not that I don’t like my digital work, but the whole business can be very cumbersome. Conversely pencils and paper are about as direct as it gets, it reduces my opportunity for hemming and hawing.
Besides it’s always good to shake up your routine.